In What is Teaching Excellence, Alan Hughes argues that excellence in teaching involves these agreed upon areas: disciplinary expertise, active involvement of students in learning, effective communication of expectations and feedback, and, most importantly, genuine interest in and care of students. He writes:

Probably most would agree that being a good teacher requires having expertise in the subject matter as well as a willingness to actively involve students in the learning process. And faculty should not only effectively communicate information in the classroom but also provide consistent and timely feedback to students on assignments. Respecting students as adults and having a good rapport with them fosters an environment conducive to learning, which in turn helps students to become effective problem solvers and to take ownership over their own learning…Being an excellent teacher means more than designing and delivering an effective lecture or being able to foster thought-provoking classroom discussions. Effective teaching extends beyond the classroom; faculty should take a sincere interest in their students and make an effort to get to know them on a personal level. Students really want to get to know their professors, too, and when they develop meaningful relationships with us, it can have a positive effect on their work ethic and increase confidence in their ability.

Finding ways to document this interest and subsequent impact remains challenging.