TLC – Teaching and Learning Conversation

conversation bubbles above two headsTLC – Teaching and Learning Conversations

Join your colleagues for discussions of teaching topics. TLCs provide opportunities to learn and exchange ideas about teaching and learning issues in a discussion-based format.  Sessions typically begin with opening remarks from facilitators and then open up to small and large group discussions.

Fall 2016

This fall, CTAL will be hosting two Teaching and Learning Conversations, one in concert with the Center for the Study of Diversity and the other in keeping with the University’s commitment to diversity and inclusion.

Please note: some previous materials incorrectly listed the times of the events below. All TLC’s occur from 12:00-1:30.

  • Wednesday, October 11th: GRIT in the Classroom
    • 12:00-1:30
    • Faculty Commons (116 Pearson Hall)
    • In association with Angela Duckworth’s lecture at the Center for the Study of Diversity later in the same day, we will discuss her contributions to the science of learning. We will consider how to cultivate passion and perseverance in our students, and to support their efforts in learning difficult tasks and concepts. While no familiarity with Dr. Duckworth’s book is assumed, those who have read her work are welcome to bring a copy to enrich our discussion.
    • Lunch will be provided for the first 15 registrants.
    • Register here: http://www.udel.edu/003239
  • Wednesday, November 1st: Handling Hot Topics in the Classroom
    • 12:00-1:30
    • Faculty Commons (116 Pearson Hall)
    • Current events in the U.S. continue to stir up intense debate in the public sphere, and that intensity can often come into the classroom. Many students can feel shut out of the conversation when hurtful remarks, microaggressions, and biases are left unaddressed. In this session we will create a proactive plan to deal with sensitive and incendiary issues in order to model a respectful dialogue in the classroom.
    • Lunch will be provided for the first 15 registrants.
    • Register here: http://www.udel.edu/003240

 

Past years:

Spring 2016

In partnership with the Center for the Study of Diversity, CTAL will focus its Spring 2016 TLCs on issues of diversity and educational climate. Each session will precede a CSD invited speaker, with whom TLC participants will have unique opportunities to interact during their follow up visit. The TLC will be a great opportunity to make connections between the speaker’s work and UD and develop key questions prior to the visit.

*Learn more about diversity and classroom on our Diversity and Inclusive Teaching page.

  • February 22, 2016 – 12-1pm  Understanding how racial literacy can improve student achievement

TLC participants will examine the work of Howard C. Stevenson, University of Pennsylvania Professor of Urban Education and Africana Studies. Referencing his book, Promoting Racial Literacy in Schools: Differences That Make a Difference, we will explore the impact of racial stress on student achievement and ways to address racially stressful incidents as they occur. Dr. Stevenson, sponsored by both CSD and School of Education, will give a public address on March 1, 2016.

Please respond – light lunch and reading materials (excerpts) will be provided.

Please register: http://www.udel.edu/002882

  • March 14, 2016 – 12-1pm The impact of diverse learning environments

This session will focus on the work of Sylvia Hurtado, UCLA Professor of Education and former director of the Higher Education Research Institute. She will visit and give a public talk at on March 16, 2016. TLC participants will explore and discuss her work assessing campus climates as well as the effect of diverse college environments on college students.

Please respond – light lunch and reading materials (excerpts) will be provided.

Please register: http://www.udel.edu/002908

  • May 2, 2016 – 12-1pm Diversity and the difference it makes

This TLC will focus on the work of Scott Page, Professor of Complex Systems, Political Science, and Economics at the University of Michigan. We will focus on his text, The Difference and Diversity and Complexity, in order to consider the contributions of diversity within complex environment of a university. Dr. Page will give a public talk on May 5, 2016.

Please respond – light lunch and reading materials (excerpts) will be provided.

Please register: http://www.udel.edu/002909

 

Fall 2015

  • October 21, 2015 – Is lecturing fair for all students? If not, what are other alternatives?

In a recent NY Times Sunday Review article, Are College Lectures Unfair?, Ann Murphy Paul considers the inequitable practice of lecturing. During this conversation, participants will review the article and explore teaching methods that promote respect, relevance, engagement and academic success.

Please Register

 

Spring 2015: Engaging Difference: Teaching for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

This spring we will consider strategies that embrace learners and perspectives across the spectrum of racial, socioeconomic status, gender, and sexual orientation differences.

  • February 25, 2015 – How can I manage and/or initiate controversial discussions?

Recent events surrounding racial profiling, police brutality, sexual assault, and hate crimes can spark controversial conversations that become rich learning opportunities.  Students are eager to talk and understand. This TLC explores how faculty and staff can address these kinds of “hot topics” in the classroom and other campus spaces. We will consider such issues as creating safe spaces, knowing when to stop, and how to address marginalization in a mostly homogeneous classrooms (i.e., across gender, sexuality, race/gender, religion, etc.).

Faculty Commons, Pearson 116

12:30-2pm

  • March 25, 2015 – What are micro-aggressions and how do they impact learning?

Micro-aggressions refers to moments of unintended and harmful discrimination. This TLC will explore how these incidents hinder, silence, and disadvantage students. It will also provide time to figure out ways to avoid this in the classroom.

Faculty Commons, Pearson 116

12:00-1:30pm

 

  • April 22, 2015 – What is stereotype threat and impostor syndrome and how this be mitigated in the classroom?

Stereotype threat and impostor syndrome refer to internalized, negative intellectual ideas that can lead to poor academic performance of minorities (e.g., a student of color, a first-generation student, or a woman in a male-dominated field). This TLC will consider how instructors can work against these phenomena and help all students succeed.

Faculty Commons, Pearson 116

12:00-1:30pm

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